Monday, June 18, 2018

Three Common Film Photography Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

6:00:00 AM

Deciding to shoot a roll of film is a big step in your journey as a photographer. When you’ve never used anything but a digital camera, the thought of entering the analog realm with all its requisite hoops to jump through can seem daunting. Film photography is rife with the potential for mistakes that can’t be undone.

All film photographers, however, have at one time or another fallen victim to the same inventory of mistakes. The upside to this is that we can learn from the blunders made by others with a shared passion for this particular medium.

Here are 3 mistakes to avoid when shooting film.

1. Not Loading Your Film Properly

It seems so easy to pop a roll of film in your camera and be on your way, but this may not always be the case. While the basic concept of loading a roll of 35mm film into a camera is relatively uniform, there might be subtle variations from camera to camera. Variations subtle enough to throw you off your game.

Generally, you insert the film cartridge on one side (usually the left), pull the film leader across to the right, make sure it catches the sprocket, attach it to the take-up spool, close the door and wind on to the first frame.

If your film is somehow misaligned or isn’t fully connected to the take-up spool, your film won’t advance and, therefore, won’t record anything. Many cameras have some sort of mechanism to indicate the film is advancing correctly — pay attention to it. If your camera doesn’t have such an indicator, look at the rewind crank/lever. It will rotate counterclockwise, indicating proper film advance.

Photo by NordWood Themes on Unsplash

2. Not Rewinding Your Film

I’ve committed the gaffe of not loading my film correctly, which proved to be costly in terms of wasted time and shots ultimately missed, but once I realized my mistake I simply re-loaded the film properly. No film wasted since it hadn’t advanced.

I have, however, witnessed in horror other photographers, perhaps in harried absent-mindedness, reach the end of a roll and not rewind the film before opening the camera.

The moment your film is exposed to light, that’s a wrap. It’s a gut punch to realize that every shot you’ve taken is now gone. There is no getting them back.

A number of the more automated film cameras have an auto-rewind feature, which is a great safety net. But if your camera lacks that feature, please remind yourself to rewind your film!

Photo by Jakob Owens on Unsplash

3. Choosing The Wrong Film Speed Setting

This is something I put myself through quite recently and is probably the mistake I’ve made most often through my years of shooting film.
With film photography, you’re locked into one film speed (or ISO as we would refer to it in digital photography) per roll. If you load a roll of Kodak Portra 400, you can set your camera to a film speed (ASA) to something other than the speed indicated on the film box, but you’ll need to stay at that setting for the whole roll.

There is no auto ISO in film photography.

Not too long ago I loaded a roll of Kodak Ektar 100 but forgot to change the ASA setting on my camera, which was still set to 1600 for a previous roll of I’d shot. So I spent half a day shooting a 100 speed color film at 1600. Luckily, Ektar proved to be a resilient film and I was pleasantly surprised with the results, considering the circumstances.

Photo by Jason D. Little | Kodak Ektar 100, accidentally shot at 1600

Photo by Jason D. Little | Kodak Ektar 100, accidentally shot at 1600

Not all film emulsions possess such great latitude. If your work is dependent upon very precise metering, your film speed setting needs to be correct. It’s easy to overlook this as you go from one roll of film to another, but to avoid any unexpected metering mistakes, double check your camera’s film speed setting each time you load a new roll of film.

In Conclusion

Each faux pas listed here is easy to make and also easy to correct. These three things are so basic to film photography that, if you can avoid them, you will probably be pretty happy with your results.

Of course, the further you go into analog photography the more opportunity for mistakes you will encounter, but it’s important to nail the basics first. If you can ease yourself into the process and keep the factors listed above under control, you will free up some mental bandwidth to use on other variables you might encounter along the way.

Always keep in mind, though, that with photography of any kind — digital or analog — the biggest mistake you can make is not allowing yourself the freedom to just have fun.

Additional Resources

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A Beginners Guide to Keywording your Photos

5:09:00 AM

Continued from Part One – A Beginners Guide to Organizing your Photos

In the first post on this subject, I talked about organizing your digital photo files. Now, I want to talk a bit about handling specific files. Beyond my clean organizational system, I use two simple techniques to help keep everything organized.

  • Keywording Your Photos - Mana Island, Fiji

    Keywords: Clouds; Fiji; Mana Island; Ocean; Pacific; Patel; Sand; Sky; South Beach; Sunrise; Varina; Varina Patel; Water;

  • Keywording Your Photos - Worimi Conservation Lands, Australia

    Keywords: Patel; Summer; Varina; Varina Patel; Australia; Dunes; Sunrise; Patterns;

Renaming Files

Bisti Wilderness, New Mexico by Varina Patel

Filename: new_mexico_0034c – Bisti Wilderness, New Mexico

First, when I download my files to my computer system, I rename them using the Adobe Bridge (or Lightroom) download application. It allows me to change the name of the file to anything I like, and I use this feature to make my life easier. If the photos are from Utah, each file gets the prefix “utah”. After that, I use the number already assigned by the camera. Those numbers just let me keep things flowing along in chronological order. So my file name for this shot from our recent trip is new_mexico.CR2. Why does that little label matter? Well – most of the time, I can tell you exactly where any given photo was taken (though I may not remember what I had for breakfast this morning)… but all those desert shots might start to look the same after a while. Some of my less memorable files could be hard to place – especially several years down the road. If I can’t quite place this image in the future, that little file name will help jog my memory… “Ah yes. Right-o. New Mexico. Now I’ve got it!”

Keywording Your Photos

Ok – so that’s the first thing. The second? Key-wording. Now, hold on! Come out of the corner! Quit knocking your forehead against the wall! It’s not as bad as it sounds!

After every trip – and before I process anything at all – I keyword my files. I don’t do this one file at a time. I do it in chunks. Let’s say I just pulled 100 photos off my memory card. My first step is to break them down into the appropriate files. For this trip, I needed three files within my New Mexico directory… White Sands, Valley of Fires, and Bosque del Apache. Once the photos are sorted, I select all the images in one file and start key-wording.

Now, I’m not talking about going nuts, here. This should be a quick and simple process. If I start getting too specific, I’ll have to keyword each and every file individually. Instead, I want to give a general overview to help me find a file if I need to search for it later. This image from White Sands gets these keywords: Desert; National Park; New Mexico; Sand Dunes; USA; Varina Patel; White Sands National Monument. That’s all the information I’ll need to find the file in the future… and if someone else is looking for it, my name gives them a little help, too. All these keywords are included in the meta-data for my file, so it is transferred to my website and to Visual Wilderness each time I upload a file. I only have to do it once, and that makes me very happy.

Keywording Your Photos & Smart Collections - Adobe Bridge

Keywording Your Photos & Smart Collections – Adobe Bridge

Since most of the images in this file are similar, all these keywords apply to the rest of the files too, so I can keyword an entire set of files in just a few seconds. Some images will need specific keywords – and I can select a few at a time (or just one) if necessary. I have one shot of Jay in this bunch of photos, so I selected it separately and added one keyword: portrait. Done. I have a standard list of keywords that I always use – so I just browse my list and check off the appropriate keywords.

To learn more about keywording your photos check out our A PHOTOGRAPHERS GUIDE TO IMAGE MANAGEMENT & PHOTO BACKUP SOLUTIONS

A PHOTOGRAPHERS GUIDE TO IMAGE MANAGEMENT & PHOTO BACKUP

Click for More Info

So, that’s how I do it. What about you? I’m sure many of you have simple tips or suggestions that might help others streamline the organization process… or get it started. Why not pass on your ideas to others who could benefit from them? We’d love to hear from you, and I’m sure many others would too.

About Author Varina Patel

There is nothing more remarkable to me than the power of nature. It is both cataclysmic and subtle. Slow and continuous erosion by water and wind can create landscapes every bit as astonishing as those shaped by catastrophic events – and minuscule details can be as breathtaking as grand vistas that stretch from one horizon to the other. Nature is incredibly diverse. Burning desert sands and mossy riverbanks… Brilliant sunbeams and fading alpenglow… Silent snowfall and raging summer storms… Each offers a unique opportunity. I am irresistibly drawn to the challenge of finding my next photograph, and mastering the skills required to capture it effectively.

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18. Juni 2018

4:03:00 AM

Das Bild des Tages von: ::ErWin


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Panasonic’s Rugged Form Factor Lumix DC-TS7 is Coming

4:00:00 AM

A much-anticipated announcement from Panasonic regarding their new Lumix DC-TS7 has action camera enthusiasts excited about the device’s planned features, including being water, dust, shock, and freeze proof, in addition to a spectacular bit of kit in terms of tech.

The successor to Panasonic’s TS6 released back in 2015, the new DC-TS7 will sport a lot of the things the previous mode lacked in terms of performance, such as 4K UHD video at 30 frames per second but also a new 20 megapixel sensor.

Image via Panasonic.

It will also have an electronic viewfinder, better grips, and even capabilities for underwear shooting. The Panasonic DC-TS7 retails for a price of $USD 447.99.

Interestingly this camera’s debut comes on the heels of Panasonic’s announcement of a partnership with American electric car manufacturer Tesla.

For those that are not aware of Tesla’s products, the manufacturer specializes in ranged, rechargeable electrical vehicles that combine performance and a luxury price tag in what many consider the premier brand in the segment.

But it also manufactures home batteries and other technology related to its core business, and that’s where Panasonic comes in to the picture. The company apparently wants to start making more lithium batteries in the future and is pivoting the company in that direction.

There is even talk of a joint “Giga Factory” in China by the two companies. Just a quick reminder of some the sophisticated stuff Panasonic does outside of its optics industry.

Here are the DC-TS7 camera’s specs according to Panasonic:

Waterproof to 101.7′ / 31m
Shockproof from 6.6′ / 2m
Freezeproof to 14°F / -10°C
Pressure-resistant to 220 lbf / 100 kgf
20.4MP High-Sensitivity MOS Sensor
4.6x Zoom Lens, 28-128mm (35mm Equiv.)
Water, Shock, Freeze, and Crushproof
UHD 4K30 and 24p Video Recording
1.17m-Dot Electronic Live View Finder
3.0″ 1.04m-Dot LCD Monitor
Built-In Wi-Fi and Geotagging Support
ISO 80-6400, 10-fps Continuous Shooting
POWER Optical Image Stabilization
4K Photo Modes and Post Focus

Image via Panasonic.

Image via Panasonic.

Image via Panasonic.

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About Us

Time Trap Photography is dedicated to freezing those special moments in life that can be revisited and admired for generations to come. - Shannon Bourque

The lens in focus

“Life is like a camera. Just focus on what’s important and capture the good times, develop from the negatives and if things don’t work out, just take another shot.” — Unknown

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