Friday, April 20, 2018

How Moonlight Effects Night Photos

6:14:00 AM

The moon often acts as your primary source of light for your night photos, just like the sun does during the day. You should always know what the moon phase will be before you got out to shoot. Photographing under a full moon can produce drastically different results than shooting under no moon. While there is no right moon phase to shoot under, there are distinct advantages and disadvantages to shooting under different phases.

You can check the moon phases and the times and locations it will set and rise with The Photographer’s Ephemeris (TPE). TPE is also available as an iTunes and Android app, and you can also use the app PhotoPills.

SHOOTING UNDER NO MOON

The biggest advantage of shooting under no moon is that your camera can capture more stars, since moonlight obscures fainter stars. This is particularly important if you want to capture dramatic shots of the Milky Way.

The biggest disadvantage of shooting under no moon is that less light enters your camera and there will be more noise visible in the photographs.

Photographs taken under no moon and with no light painting will usually render foreground objects as dark silhouettes. This can be good for objects with interesting shapes, like a saguaro cactus, a gnarled tree, or some of the bizarre rock formations in America’s Desert Southwest. It probably won’t work as well for things with less distinct shapes, like mountains or canyons.

If you want to do light painting with a flashlight, you’ll generally want to do this under no moon. However, I personally don’t do light painting much anymore, as I believe it can produce unnatural looking results. I prefer blending multiple exposures if I want to render detail in the foreground under no moon. This is beyond the scope of this article, but I provide detailed explanations on how to do this in my night photography book and videos on my website.

Arches National Park & Milky Way

Night Photo without Moonlight – Arches National Park, Utah

SHOOTING UNDER A FULL MOON

The advantages and disadvantages of shooting under a full or gibbous moon are the reverse of shooting under no moon. With the bright light of a full moon, you will get less noise in your images. This can be advantageous if you are using an older digital camera or if you don’t have a lens with a wide aperture that can let in more light.

Another potential advantage of shooting under a full moon is that it will illuminate the foreground and bring out the color and detail in the scene, in much the same way as the sun would. If the foreground is the most important part of your image and you’re not as concerned with capturing a dramatic starscape, you may want to shoot under a full moon.

The biggest disadvantage of shooting under a full moon is that it obscures the light from the stars, and the skies will not look as impressive.

It’s generally best to photograph with the moon behind you, so that it illuminates the front of the object you are photographing. Also, it is usually better to shoot with the moon low in the sky. If it is high in the sky, it can produce harsh light, just like the sun does during the day. Shooting with the moon behind you and low in the sky will also keep the part of the sky you are photographing a little darker and more stars will be visible.

Anasazi Ruin at Night

Night Photo under Fill Moon – Ancient Anasazi

NIGHT PHOTOS UNDER A CRESCENT MOON

While there can be some advantages to shooting under a full moon, I find that the bright light usually obscures the stars too much. Also, with newer cameras and fast lenses, noise is not as big of an issue as it used to be. I therefore find shooting under a crescent moon preferable if I want to render detail in the foreground and capture more stars in the sky.

I generally like shooting under a crescent moon that is 15%-35% illuminated. This provides just enough light to illuminate the foreground, while only somewhat obscuring the stars. Also, a crescent moon sets fairly early in the night, so if you also want to take shots under moon, you can do so after it sets.

If the moon is more than 50% illuminated, I find that it starts to drown out the light from the stars too much. I therefore usually plan my photography trips so that they end after the first quarter moon.

Mount Baldy at Night

Paradise Divide in Colorado under quarter moon.

Feel free to share you own idea in the comments below.

Let's block ads! (Why?)


Visual Wilderness https://ift.tt/2HC8hrC

Sourced by Time Trap Photography sharing the best photography tips, news and tricks throughout the industry. Time Trap Photography is dedicated to freezing those special moments in life that can be revisited and admired for generations to come. - Shannon Bourque
Please visit our main site for booking availability and rates.



"Time


Receive valuable industry knowledge delivered free to your email each day.


"Time

20. April 2018

4:05:00 AM

Das Bild des Tages von: Thorsten Kaser


kwerfeldein – Magazin für Fotografie https://ift.tt/2Hg50Lj

Sourced by Time Trap Photography sharing the best photography tips, news and tricks throughout the industry. Time Trap Photography is dedicated to freezing those special moments in life that can be revisited and admired for generations to come. - Shannon Bourque
Please visit our main site for booking availability and rates.



"Time


Receive valuable industry knowledge delivered free to your email each day.


"Time

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Blackmagic Design Premiers New Pocket Cinema Camera 4K

8:04:00 AM

Following on the success of 2013’s Pocket Cinema Camera, Blackmagic Design’s compact camera sporting a Super 16 sensor with cinema-recording quality capabilities, the company has announced another iteration in the now-popular line: Meet the new Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

Like its predecessor, the Pocket Cinema Camera 4K will allow users to record cinema-quality footage but also will feature significant upgrades over the Pocket Cinema Camera in response to user requests for a more ergonomic and field-friendly form factor.

Debuting at NAB in Las Vegas, the new Pocket Cinema Camera 4K is designed around a core Four Thirds sensor with dual native ISO and a native DCI 4K (4096×2160) resolution. The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K records DCI 4K at 60 fps and windowed HD (a native 1080 crop) at up to 120 fps in either 10-bit ProRes or 12-bit Raw formats according to DP Review. The camera will support standard SD cards, UHS-II cards, and CFast 2.0 cards for storage.

Image via Blackmagic.

Blackmagic is also promising external recording capabilities through the device’s USB-C port. There is also a full sized HDMI port, a mini XLR input with 48v phantom power for audio, 3.5mm audio input, and a headphone jack to boot. The camera is powered by a standard Canon LP-E6 battery as well as a locking DC power connector that prevents accidental unplugging.

The back of the camera will have a large 5″ touchscreen with 1920×1080 resolution. Further, and somewhat as a special incentive to users, the Black Magic Cinema Camera 4K will also have a license for DaVinci Resolve Studio software.

In describing the camera, Grant Petty, Blackmagic Design CEO said in a press release: “Customers love the original Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera and have been asking us for a 4K version…We’ve listened and built a camera that combines all of our newest ideas and customer feedback from the previous model! The new Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K is exciting because it packs so much technology into an incredibly small design. We feel it will go well beyond what customers expected. It’s perfect for anyone that needs a truly professional ultra compact digital film camera. This is not a consumer camera that's trying to do high end work, it’s a true high end camera designed for high end work.”

Blackmagic has not mentioned a specific street date for the camera as of press but the pricing announced puts the unit at $1295.

Image via Blackmagic.

Image via Blackmagic.

Let's block ads! (Why?)


Light Stalking https://ift.tt/2HCTTPW

Sourced by Time Trap Photography sharing the best photography tips, news and tricks throughout the industry. Time Trap Photography is dedicated to freezing those special moments in life that can be revisited and admired for generations to come. - Shannon Bourque
Please visit our main site for booking availability and rates.



"Time


Receive valuable industry knowledge delivered free to your email each day.


"Time

This is Why Post-Production On Dual Monitors is Better

6:09:00 AM

Do you still do your post-production on a single monitor? If so you are missing out on a whole world of extra space and efficiency. Now I know some people will be restricted by budgetary considerations, but for those who have a little spare cash, a second monitor is will be one of the best investments you could make. Bear in mind your second monitor does not have to be as big or as high quality as your primary one, you can easily opt for a budget or even secondhand monitor if you only intend to use it as extra workspace for tools and browsers.

Whilst this article is based on Apple MacOs, it is as relevant to Windows as well. Dual monitors are very easy to set up on both operating systems and there are plenty of video tutorials on how to do that. So let’s look at what we can do with a dual monitor setup.

Lightroom spread across two screens

Simple organisation:

Be it explorer in Windows or Finder in MacOS, having two separate windows open on two different screens can significantly improve your efficiency. The biggest time saver is being able to display images in large thumbnail view and move them across to new folders. This might be during initial import where you have your card reader open on one screen and your photos folder on the other. You can drag all of your new images to one specific folder or pick and choose images to go to different folders.

The same applies to simple organisation of your images. You can copy or move images from one folder to another easily without having to spend time trying to re-size individual folders on one screen and reduce the thumbnail size in order to see enough images.

Adobe Lightroom On Dual Screen Monitors

Where dual monitors really come into their own is in post-productionon software. We will look at two common programs, Lightroom and Photoshop but many post-production editing programs will allow multi-monitor support. Let's look at Lightroom and how to initially set up a dual monitor workspace.

The easiest way is to open Lightroom on your primary monitor then go to the menu and select Window – Secondary Display – Show. Under this menu item, you will see a number of choices of what to display on your secondary monitor. Selecting Grid is a good option both in the Library and Develop modules. This will allow you to display the full-size image on the primary monitor and the entire album in grid form on the secondary.

Even better is that in the Develop module you can use the Library Filters in the Grid to isolate the images you wish to work on. Other options for the secondary monitor include Loupe, Compare, and Survey. You can also zoom in and out of full-size images on the secondary display.

Using comparison on dual screens in Lightroom

Secondary display options in Lightroom

Adobe Photoshop On Dual Screen Monitors

In some respects Photoshop is even more flexible than Lightroom when it comes to dual screens. Although it does not have the dedicated menu setting, virtually all the elements on the Photoshop interface can be undocked and moved to a new location.

For example, if I want to have the Histogram/Channels/Layers tools on my second monitor, I simply click and drag on the top bar of that particular palette. The same is true for the toolbar usually found on the left of the interface, even the main image window can be dragged and resized onto either monitor. The advantage of this is that you can drag all of your tools and palettes to your secondary monitor leaving just the image on the primary. This means that you can fill your primary display with the working image.

Undocking Photoshop palettes to a secondary screen.

Beyond this, Photoshop allows you to save workspaces. So having set up the dual screens for best efficiency you can save that. To do this go to the Photoshop menu and click Window – Workspace – New Workspace. You can then give it a suitable name. Now when you wish to re-open that particular workspace you go to the menu Window – Workspace – (YOUR WORKSPACE)

Saving a dual screen workspace in Photoshop

Working with dual monitors is a great way to give you significantly more editing real estate and to dramatically improve your efficiency. Most graphics cards have multiple video outputs these days and given the price of monitors it's an investment well worth making.

Let's block ads! (Why?)


Light Stalking https://ift.tt/2F0f1u1

Sourced by Time Trap Photography sharing the best photography tips, news and tricks throughout the industry. Time Trap Photography is dedicated to freezing those special moments in life that can be revisited and admired for generations to come. - Shannon Bourque
Please visit our main site for booking availability and rates.



"Time


Receive valuable industry knowledge delivered free to your email each day.


"Time

About Us

Time Trap Photography is dedicated to freezing those special moments in life that can be revisited and admired for generations to come. - Shannon Bourque

The lens in focus

“Life is like a camera. Just focus on what’s important and capture the good times, develop from the negatives and if things don’t work out, just take another shot.” — Unknown

TIME TRAP PHOTOGRAPHY COPYRIGHT 2016