Sunday, October 22, 2017

A Photographer’s Guide To Frankfurt

7:01:00 AM

Among European cities, Frankfurt would not probably be high on a first choice list for photographers. Consider the competition, London, Paris, Rome and many more. The city itself was extensively bombed during World War II and little original remains. From the destruction, however, Frankfurt re-invented itself as a financial capital, First of the re-emerging West Germany then in more recent years as the epicenter of the EU’s financial dealings. With money comes modern skyscrapers, and it is these, the compact city center and the River Main running through it that make the city an appealing destination for photographers. Today we are going to take a look at some of the photogenic locations in Frankfurt.

Frankfurt's modern architecture is it's main attraction. By Jason Row Photography

Situated at the heart of Germany and Western Europe, Frankfurt has superb connections from pretty much anywhere in the world. Its airport is a global hub and one of the busiest in the world. Trains and buses arrive from all over Europe at its Central Station on the western edge of the city center.

The primary focus for most photographers visiting Frankfurt will be the modern architecture. City skyline images are best shot from the southern bank of the River Main. With the river running more or less east to west, the main financial district is well suited for shots both morning and evening.

For dawn and early morning shots, a walk across the Friedensbrücke bridge and a stroll eastwards along the river can yield some great shots. In summer this is the time that river cruise boats pass or dock in the city. These long, low vessels can add an interesting contrast to the city skyline.

The next bridge east is Holbeinsteg, a modern, interesting pedestrian bridge that can be used to frame the skyline of the financial district. In the early morning, the soft golden light can make the tall modern buildings look quite spectacular.

Holbeinsteg makes a good frame for the city skyline. By Jason Row Photography

For evening and nighttime shots of the skyline its best to head further east along the River Main. One of the more favored locations here Ignatz-Bubis-Brucke. This road bridge affords great views of the city skyline with the sun setting behind it. It is also excellent blue hour shots. From this vantage point, you will need a moderate to long telephoto to pull in the skyline. An added bonus is that you can include the more ornate Alte Brucke in the foreground. This provides an interesting contrast of old and new.

Vantages points to the east are better for Evening shots. By Kiefer

To get up close and personal with the modern financial architecture head to Willy-Brandt-Platz. This is best in the late afternoon or early evening. Situated at the southern end of the main cluster of financial buildings it features a huge monument to the Euro. Shaped in the form of the currency symbol.  it is called, imaginatively, Euro-Skulptur. In the afternoons, you can get deep blue skies when using a polarizer from this location. As the evening kicks in and blue hour falls the lights of the building and indeed the Euro-Skulptur come on and make for some excellent low light shots.

The heart of Euroland. By Jason Row Photography

Further close and abstract shots of the modern architecture can be made from Gallusanlage Park which runs along the western edge of the district.

Apart from the financial district, there are a few other interesting locations for photographers in Frankfurt. The pretty Opernplatz features the very ornate Alte Opera 19th Century concert hall which also features a very beautiful fountain in front of it. Strangely this is offset by large garish pink water pipes running elevated along the western edge of the square.

Openplatz is one of the city's older and more photogenic squares. By Jason Row Photography

Romerberg is the heart of what used to the old medieval center of the city and was largely destroyed. It has since been rebuilt to recreate the original with a row of ornate houses on the eastern side of the square and largely authentic city hall (Rathaus) to the west.

Returning to modern architecture, further east along the River Main and standing on its own is the new, European Central Bank building. This vast monolith towers over the largest low-level surroundings. Again is the best shot from the southern side of the River Main


My trip to Frankfurt was primarily to shoot the architecture of the financial district for stock images and video. I would not personally choose it as a sole destination for photography. However, in the surrounding countryside, there are many other more ornate and photogenic towns to visit. However, if you enjoy shooting modern architecture and skyscrapers, Frankfurt is one of the few cities in Europe that has a dramatic modern skyline reminiscent of the major US and Asian financial centers.

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These Are the Features That Will Make Cameras Amazing in the Next Few Years

5:01:00 AM

Our cameras are pretty amazing tools. Compared to just a short few years ago, their capabilities are immense. Although it might not seem like it, there are still plenty of areas where our cameras could be improved. We might look at our images and think there is little room for improvement technically. However, think back a few years, and you were probably saying the same thing. However, our image quality is demonstrably better today than five years ago. So what are the things that could be improved in the next generation of cameras?

Dynamic range is one of the biggest things that can be improved. This is particularly true with smaller sensors but also pertinent to full frame cameras. Modern cameras can reproduce between 11-14 stops of dynamic range. A pretty high figure but a long way to go before it matches our own vision.
Dynamic range is a technology that certainly improves with each generation of camera. Recent advances have introduced software improvements as well as hardware to help us get the maximum dynamic range. It could be that faster processors and advanced software will be the key to improving dynamic range in the future.

Better dynamic range could make HDR a thing of the past. By Ahmad Rithauddin

Low Light Performance

Another key area for improvement, low light performance is important to many of us. Again massive strides have been made. However, these have generally been limited to larger sensors cameras such as the Nikon, Canon and Sony full frame machines. APS-C and m43 sensors have improved but are not yet competing with full frame. The problem is pixel density. To keep up with demand for higher resolutions, pixels need to be closer and closer together. This is proving challenging for the sensor manufacturers. They have find a happy medium between noise reduction and resolution. Like dynamic range this is more likely to be improved using software rather than hardware.

There is still plenty of scope for low light improvement. By Nick Rice

Write speeds are tremendous compared to a short few years ago, but they could be better. The reason is that more and more of us prefer to shoot RAW. With increased resolution RAW file sizes are becoming huge and our cameras struggle to process these files. This is especially true when we are shooting in fast continuous modes.

Whilst our camera might rattle of continuous Jpegs at 12 frames per second for dozens of shots, switch to RAW and this soon slows down. Not only that, the buffer can take much longer to clear with RAWs.
Improved write speeds will depend not only on the camera manufacturers finding faster ways to write files but also memory card companies improving the capabilities of their flash memory.

This is the big challenge for mirrorless cameras at the moment. Whilst DSLRs have incredible battery life, the mirrorless equivalents struggle. This is due to their increased power consumption, electronic viewfinders being the main culprit, and smaller size, hence smaller batteries.
Given the rapid improvements in battery technology over recent years, I am sure we will soon start to see mirrorless cameras lasting the same number of shots as their DSLR equivalents.

Imagine just needing one battery. By See-ming Lee

The area in which auto focus could best be improved is perhaps artificial intelligence. Today’s focusing systems are incredibly rapid, but they sometimes fall flat on moving subjects. A.I. would improve the way focusing systems predict movement, especially erratic movement of subjects.
Another area where focus could be improved is in low light and low contrast situations. These are particularly weak areas for current focussing systems.

Resolution is an interesting one as it is possibly more driven by consumer demand than practical applications. Whilst professionals might require ultra high resolution for commercial work, the vast majority of prosumers do not need it. Yet, for some reason resolution has always been the marker of technological improvement in digital cameras. This improved resolution is often at the expense of image noise at higher ISOs.

The increasing addition of IBIS or in-body image stabilisation to cameras demonstrates that the manufacturers are taking this very seriously as a technological advance. Some companies now have cameras that have dual stabilisations systems, in body and on lens that work together.
The improvement in this technology is driven both by the increasing demand for video and the technological hurdles of increased resolution and image noise. The later being countered by the ability to hand hold the camera at much lower ISOs.

Camera stabilisation is another key improvement. By Riley Kaminer

Technology in photography is increasing at a rapid rate, yet the above issues are likely to be the biggest areas for improvement for several years ahead. What are the technological advances you would most like to see in your future cameras?


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22. Oktober 2017

4:02:00 AM

Das Bild des Tages von: Mostly Tim


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browserfruits 42.2017

12:22:00 AM

Noch eine Woche lang habt Ihr Zeit, Eure Bilder bei unserem kwerfeldein Award einzureichen. Das Thema des diesjährigen Fotowettbewerbs ist „Lichtspiele“. Zu gewinnen gibt es passend dazu lichtstarke Objektive von SIGMA. Wir freuen uns auf Eure Einreichungen!

 

Linktipps

• Das ZDF hat eine Videodokumentation über die Firma Kodak und erklärt darin, wieso der einstige Gigant heute am Rand des Ruins steht. → ansehen

• Wer bei Hundefotografie direkt an kitschige oder langweilige Aufnahmen denkt, wird vom Buch „Really Good Dog Photography“ überrascht sein. Das British Journal of Photography stellt es kurz vor und zeigt ein paar schöne, außergewöhnliche Fotos daraus. → ansehen

• „Warum ich ein Tschaka-Tschaka-Fotograf bin“: Stefan Anker erzählt, warum er gern im Serienmodus arbeitet, auch wenn das zu viel Kritik führt. → ansehen

• Lomography hat den Fotografen Simas Lin interviewt, der surreale Lichtstimmungen in urbanen Szenen festhält. → ansehen

• Der CEO einer Firma für Stative erklärt in einem kleinen Rant, wie man Botschafter für seine Firma werden kann und was er von Fotografen dafür erwartet. → ansehen

• Habt Ihr schon einmal in den Fotokisten Eurer Eltern gestöbert und gemerkt, dass sie eindeutig cooler waren als Ihr? → ansehen

• Die Industrie-Fotografin Hilla Becher starb am letzten Samstag im Alter von 83 Jahren. Die FAZ hat einen Nachruf veröffentlicht. → ansehen

• Außergewöhnliche Hochzeitsbilder zeigt Bored Panda in Zusammenarbeit mit den Fearless Awards. → ansehen

• Frédéric Duriez koloriert Vintage-Portraits. My Modern Met stellt diese kurz vor. → ansehen

 

Buchempfehlungen

„Willy Ruge: Fotografien 1919–1953“ erscheint anlässlich der weltweit ersten Retrospektive des Fotografen Willy Ruge bei C/O Berlin. Ruge ist Teil gesellschaftlicher Umbrüche und von den technischen Möglichkeiten der Moderne Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts fasziniert. Er ist kein stiller Beobachter am Rand, sondern mitten im Geschehen. Oft sogar so sehr im Zentrum, dass er selbst als Akteur ins Bild tritt. Mit dieser Haltung entwickelt Ruge nicht nur die Rolle und das Selbstverständnis des Bildjournalisten neu – die sachlich-objektive Darstellung ersetzt er durch subjektive, scheinbar rein zufällig festgehaltene Erfahrungen. Das Buch ist im Verlag Steidl erschienen und kostet 28 €.

„Im UnRuhestand“ : Portraits von über 200 „UnRuheständler*innen“, die Arne Wesenberg mit seiner analogen Großformatkamera in einem Zeitraum von über sieben Jahren portraitiert hat, finden sich im neuen Bildband aus dem Verlag Kehrer. Allen gemein ist, dass sie trotz ihres hohen Alters immer noch mitten in der Gesellschaft und im Berufsleben stehen. Das Buch kostet 48 €.

 

Ausstellungen

Landwirtschaft der Gifte. Ihr Preis für den Menschen. Fotografien von Pablo E. Piovano
Zeit: 20. Oktober 2017 bis 21. Januar 2018
Ort: Freundeskreis Willy-Brandt-Haus, Stresemannstr. 28, 10963 Berlin

Der Skandal von Minamata 1971–73. Fotografien von W. Eugene Smith
Zeit: 20. Oktober 2017 bis 21. Januar 2018
Ort: Freundeskreis Willy-Brandt-Haus, Stresemannstr. 28, 10963 Berlin

Innere Gebiete
Zeit: 19. Oktober bis 23. November 2017
Ort: Galerie TZB, Tschechisches Zentrum, Wilhelmstr. 44, 10117 Berlin

Balthasar Burkhard
Zeit: 20. Oktober 2017 bis 14. Januar 2018
Ort: Museum Folkwang, Museumsplatz 1, 45128 Essen

 

Drüben auf Instagram

@benhammer_ – Auf Instagram zeigt der Kölner Fotograf eine Auswahl seiner Schwarzweißportraits.

 

Fotowettbewerbe

ZEISS Photography Award

Der ZEISS Photography Award geht in die dritte Runde und ruft ambitionierte Fotograf*innen weltweit dazu auf, ihre Werke zum Thema „Seeing Beyond – Untold Stories“ der internationalen Jury zu präsentieren. Bis zum 6. Februar 2018 könnt Ihr Fotoserien aus fünf bis zehn Bildern einreichen. Zu gewinnen gibt es ZEISS Foto-Objektive eigener Wahl im Gesamtwert von 12.000 € sowie 3.000 € Reisekosten für ein Fotoprojekt.

 

Der Neue BFF-Förderpreis

Der BFF – Berufsverband Freie Fotografen und Filmgestalter e.V. bietet Studierenden der Fotografie ab dem 4. Semester jetzt einmal jährlich ein neuartiges Förderprogramm für 15 Teilnehmer*innen mit Workshops, einer krönenden Preisverleihung in Zingst und einer anschließenden Ausstellungstour. Einsendeschluss ist der 15. November 2017.

 

Videos

Ted Forbes erklärt, wieso es wichtig ist, auch Kameras, die nicht auf dem aktuellen Stand der technischen Höhe sind, zu nutzen.

 

Nowness stellt den Fotografen Nobuyoshi Araki in einem Videoportrait vor. (nsfw)

 

Unser Titelbild stammt heute von Joshua Woller. Vielen Dank dafür!


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Sourced by Time Trap Photography sharing the best photography tips, news and tricks throughout the industry. Time Trap Photography is dedicated to freezing those special moments in life that can be revisited and admired for generations to come. - Shannon Bourque
Please visit our main site for booking availability and rates.



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About Us

Time Trap Photography is dedicated to freezing those special moments in life that can be revisited and admired for generations to come. - Shannon Bourque

The lens in focus

“Life is like a camera. Just focus on what’s important and capture the good times, develop from the negatives and if things don’t work out, just take another shot.” — Unknown

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