Tuesday, September 26, 2017

An Incredibly Useful Beginner’s Photoshop Tutorial

5:01:00 AM

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Adobe Photoshop is the go-to photo editing and manipulation software available online, mainly used by professional photographers and designers. It can be used for almost any kind of image editing, whether that be touch-ups, creating graphics from scratch and more. With a huge variety of tools, you can achieve almost anything using Photoshop once you know how, but for the average beginner who’s just getting started, the menus can be a little overwhelming. With a little help, you’ll be on your way to mastering the software and producing your own quality images. It is also worth noting that there are many other programs available that do the same job as Photoshop, many of which aim to use the same simple layout that Photoshop uses, and so you might even find this guide applies to programs other than Photoshop.

Within Photoshop, you are presented with a basic interface when you first load the program, no matter the operating system you are running; the interface will be the same. Upon opening Photoshop you’ll be presented with a blank screen and multiple toolbars, there will be no document to edit or any prompts to let you know where to go. You’ll find three main toolbars; The navigation bar at the top of your screen (this includes everything from file to a help menu), to the left-hand side you’ll find the main toolbar with an abundance of tools for you to use and to the right side of the screen you’ll find the layers tab as well as the colour picker and a few other features.

Photoshop Interface

Photoshop Interface

Firstly let’s look at the navigation bar and find out what we have to work with up here. You’ll probably be familiar with most of the options you have on the navigation bar as they tend to be the same with all programs. Such drop-downs as “file” remain largely the same as with any program, allowing you to create a new image, open an existing image, save your current image, print the image and more. While the options available to you in the navigation bar might seem vast, many are simple to master and others are ones you are likely not to touch until you’re a seasoned veteran.

Now let’s look at the one section of Photoshop you’re going to need to know inside out. The toolbar, this includes absolutely every tool you’re going to need, whether you plan to create a new masterpiece or just play around with some images. The toolbar houses everything from the simple move tool and lasso tool to the crop tool and eyedropper. Once you get to know your toolbar you’ll have won half the battle. So let’s walk you through your toolbar, starting at the top and working down. The toolbar we’re looking at is the Photoshop CS6 version but all tools will be the same regardless of version. It’s also worth noting that each tool has variations such as the line tool also having shape variations that will appear in a small drop down if you click and hold the tool for a second, we will talk about some of these variations while leaving others for you to explore on your own.

Move Tool

This tool is pretty self-explanatory, use it to move and make a selection on your image. You’ll usually use this tool to move each layer of your image (We’ll talk about layers later). Clicking and dragging the layer you have selected will allow you to freely move it, if you wish to limit the movement of the layer to just horizontally and vertically you can hold the [Shift] key before clicking to move the layer.

Select Tool

Also known as the “marquee tool”, this is another simple tool. Use it to make selections on your image, the stock variation of this tool is the “rectangular selection tool”, this means the selection will always be in the shape of a rectangle. If you wish to use one of the other selection tools, you can click and hold the rectangle selection tool and a variety of other tools will display via a small pop out. While you have an area selected only that part of the whole image/layer will be edited by other tools. If you wish to keep the [Shift] key pressed while dragging your selection, the shape will become restricted to a perfect square, while if you hold the [Alt] key, you’ll find the selection restricted to starting where you first clicked your cursor.

Lasso Tool (With Variations)

The lasso tool is another one of the easier tools to master, it has 3 variations; Lasso Tool, Polygon Lasso Tool and Magnetic Lasso Tool. Each variation of the tool does the same job slightly differently. The lasso tool will likely be the default tool you see, however, this is probably going to be one of the tools you use least. The lasso tool is another selection tools, it allows you to draw around the area you’d like to select using free-hand (Extremely tough when using a mouse), the polygon lasso tool allows you to do the same thing except rather than freehand it will only make selections using lines (once everything has been selected this will form a polygon), and the magnetic lasso tool will magnetise itself to the closest line within your image (for example, if you were drawing around a square it would detect the edges and magnetise itself to the edge). To complete your selection you can either; draw until you reach your start point again and then select the start point or double click (this will draw a straight line from your current position to the beginning regardless of whether it cuts through your image or not).

Magic Wand Tool

This is another example of a selection tool that allows you to select a block of colour or transparency wherever you click on the image/layer. Once selected, you’re presented with some options/settings, one of these is ‘tolerance’; tolerance is the colour range that is selected upon clicking (Example: If you select a white background with a tolerance of 32, then you will select all white as well as the 32 closest shades of white/grey to the original white colour you selected).

Crop Tool

The crop tools works like any other crop tool you’ve ever seen. Similar to the rectangular selection tool in the fact that it allows you to select a rectangular area, with the major difference being that once you have selected an area you can hit [Enter] and your image will be cropped to the size of the box you just drew. Everything on the outside of your box will be deleted and you will be left with a new, resized image.

Eye Dropper

The eyedropper is a great little tool that helps you pick out any colour on your current image. It will always replace your foreground colour unless you press and hold [Alt]; if [Alt] is pressed while selecting a colour it will replace the background colour (See Foreground and Background Colour tool). The eyedropper will select the exact colour of the area you clicked.

Healing Brush Tool

This is one of the more advanced tools you might use. The healing brush is used to replace scratches and specs you might find on your image. It works much like a mixture of the paintbrush and clone stamp tool (both below), allowing you to select a ‘clean’ area of your image to essentially copy from using [Alt] and then selecting the ‘clean’ area. Once you have selected that area you can release [Alt] and then just paint over the scratches or specs you wish to cover up. The advantage of this over both the paintbrush and clone stamp tool is that it attempts to blend the colour you have copied, so nothing looks out of place but your scratches and specs have disappeared.

Paintbrush Tool

Perhaps the simplest tool you’ll use. It’s exactly as expected, it paints onto your image using the colour, size, and brush you have selected. Although simple, the paintbrush does come with a few options/settings which make it a little more advanced, you can select things such as weight, hardness and more.

Clone Stamp Tool

The clone stamp tool is very similar to the healing brush tool in the fact that they do the same job, the only difference between the two being, that the clone stamp tool doesn’t attempt to blend the image afterward you have copied one part to another. It leaves whatever was copied as a direct copy regardless of tone, hue or even colour. Once again, holding [Alt] will allow you to select the area you wish to copy with a click. Once, selected you can release [Alt] and copy from one spot to another as if you were using the paintbrush tool.

History Brush Tool

The history brush tool is likely to be another tool you might not touch (I know I rarely use it). It works similar to the paintbrush tool except it paints from the original image (or the history state selected). You can select history state by going into ‘Window’ > ‘History’, allowing you to open the history palette. The history palette does give you a few options, these are basically the option between ‘Linear History’ or ‘Non-Linear History’ but we’ll leave this for now as that’s getting a little more complex than we need to.

Eraser Tool

Working much like you’d expect an eraser to work; it removes anything from the selected image/layer. If you have multiple layers and have one selected it will remove everything to a transparent background, while if you have the background layer selected you’ll find yourself erasing the image to see the background colour that is selected.

Fill Bucket Tool

The fill bucket is basically a paintbrush that will fill any area with paint. I find it easiest to use this tool in conjunction with a selection tool, select the area you wish to fill and then click within your selection to have it filled with the colour you have selected.

Blur Tool

The blur tool makes things blurry. Click and drag your image to blur that section of the image. It’s as simple as that.

The Burn Tool

This again is another tool you might not use up until you’re feeling more confident in your ability. It’s the burn tool, all this tool does is make areas of your image darker, so if you wished to add a shadow behind an item on your image this would be your tool.

Pen Tool

The pen tool is a little more advanced but no less simple to use, it creates clipping paths and can even be used as a more accurate selection tool. You can bend the shape of your path by clicking and dragging, allowing you to bend your path around most images, creating and selecting everything you need.

Text Tool

This tool allows you to add text to your image, controlling the font and size with the options. Clicking a single point and dragging your text box to the desired size will set the boundaries for your text.

Path Selection Tool

You use this tool when working with paths (So using it with your pen tool is most common); it allows you to select your path rather than the Image or layer and move the points on your path.

Line Tool

The line tool is used to draw straight lines, as you’d expect, given the name. It is often known as the shape tool as its variations come in the form of shapes, such as; rectangle shape tool, rounded rectangle shape tool and more.

Hand Tool

The hand tool is similar to the move tool, except the hand tool doesn’t move your image around the window/screen; instead, it moves your view around the image. So, if you’re busy working on one section of your image and don’t wish to zoom out in order to focus on a new section, the hand tool will be of use.

Zoom Tool

The zoom tool allows you to zoom in on your image, I mean, would you expect anything else? Zooming in on your image will never change the size of your image, only the zoom level. If you find yourself zoomed in and finding it hard to zoom back out all you have to do is double-click the zoom tool to return to normal 100% view. You can also zoom in and out using [Alt] and the scroll wheel on your mouse.

Foreground and Background Colour Tool

Not really a tool but still worth mentioning along with all the tools. Photoshop allows you to choose a foreground and background colour, allowing you to have two colours chosen at any one time. You can easily switch these two colours positions (foreground becomes background and vise-versa) by clicking the small 90° arrows above the colour displays. You can also reset the foreground and background colours to black and white by clicking the small black and white boxes displayed above the colour displays.

Now, moving onto layers, paths and more, all of which can be found on the right side of your screen. These are all important when depending on the tools you’re using. Ideally, layers should always be used in order to keep your image ordered and tidy.

Layers

The layer tool is useful for helping you keep your images tidy, allowing you to layer multiple images and edits together on top of each other. This means you can edit certain parts of an image (so long as it’s on a separate layer) without editing the full image. Understanding layers will certainly help you on your way to mastering Photoshop.

Paths

The paths tool is used in combination with the pen tool, whenever you draw a path using your pen, the path drawn will end up here as a path layer.

Colour and Swatches

Another important tool you’ll find on the right-hand side of your screen is the colour and swatches tabs. The colour tab is essentially a colour picker, allowing you to modify and choose your own colour as well as saving colours you have used. Upon opening the colour picker, you’ll be able to mix your own colours using the hue, saturation, balance and more. You’ll find any saved colours within your ‘swatches’ tab (only after clicking ‘Add to Swatches’ in the colour picker).

Now you know how everything works within Photoshop, you might want to find some quick shortcuts to save you some time while clicking around creating your masterpiece. Here are some simple shortcuts for you to use.



Table of Shortcuts

Table of Shortcuts

There are other shortcuts within Photoshop but we won’t run through those right now. Maybe we’ll look back in the future and come up with a more advanced guide for you all. But for now, we hope you can get started with creating your masterpieces.

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Antonio Lenza

Antonio is a photographer and trainer of over three decades experience and is the founder of the excellent London School of Photography.

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26. September 2017

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Monday, September 25, 2017

Time Trap Event Instagram Photo - September 25, 2017 at 08:30PM

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Time Trap Event Instagram Photo - September 25, 2017 at 02:16PM

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6 Tips for Photographing Fall Colors

6:11:00 AM
Fall in Zion National Park

A wide angle lens helps take in this grand scene in Zion National Park.

Autumn is my favorite season for photography. First, being out in nature during the fall just feels good. As I write this, we are camped near Grand Teton National Park and the first signs of autumn are coming to the park. The grasses are turning from green to golden. Small shrubs, willows, and even a few aspen trees are showing hints of yellow. On a hike last night, we experienced the signature smell of fall – the pungent scent of decaying leaves that marks the transition from summer to fall. For photography, all of these changes offer a magical but short window of time to capture nature’s most brilliant colors. In this post, I will share six tips to help make the most of your time in the field during this special time of year.

Fall Colors, Vermont

In this photo, some of the trees are still green which adds some color contrast and interest to this fall scene. You do not need “peak fall color” to create an interesting photograph.

#1: Don’t Limit Yourself to “Peak” Fall Color

If you ask ten photographers to define what peak fall color looks like in a particular area, you are likely to get a wide variety of answers. A few years ago, for example, we were photographing fall colors in Vermont and overheard a local say that we missed peak color, since the trees looked so much better the previous week. This comment seemed strange to us since quite a few trees were still green and for the trees that had changed color, most still had their leaves. To us, it seemed like we were a bit early, which was perfect because the trees offered a vibrant mix of greens, yellows, reds, and even some purples.

Limiting your fall photography to the few days of “peak” color means that you could be missing all kinds of opportunities to create photographs on the edges of the season. Successful fall photographs can be made as the leaves start to transition, when most trees have changed and still have their leaves, and after trees have shed their leaves. So, if you get to a place when other define the colors as too early or too late, don’t be disappointed. Opportunities can still abound if you approach your subjects with an open mind.

Fall Colors, San Juan Mountains of Colorado

I took this photo on a clear day. A cloud-filled sky could have overwhelmed the scene with too much color whereas the blue sky helps simplify the scene.

#2: Think Beyond Sunrise and Sunset

In preparing this post, I looked through all of the my fall color photographs and very few of them include a colorful sky. For my photography, I sometimes think that orange and pink clouds can be too colorful when paired with an already colorful autumn scene. Thus, I always try to seek out a variety of weather and cloud conditions when photographing fall colors. This means that in addition to photographing at sunrise and sunset, I also like to photograph at twilight, during stormy weather (my favorite!), or even under clear blue skies. Thinking beyond sunrise and sunset provides the opportunity to add diversity to a fall colors portfolio.

Fall Canopy, Colorado

By photographing into the sun, the leaves become brighter and translucent with backlighting.

#3: Experiment with Different Kinds of Light

Photographing during the autumn offers a lot of opportunities for experimenting with differing kinds of lighting. The photos in this post show the range of opportunities a photographer can encounter in the fall: even lighting over a scene (minimizing highlights and shadows), bright diffused light (foggy conditions under bright sunlight), backlighting (when photographing towards the sun), and creating my own even light over small scenes. Autumn leaves will look different under each of these scenarios. For example, with a backlit scene, the leaves will look bright, vibrant, and somewhat translucent. With more even lighting, leaves will take on a more muted appearance. Thus, you can experiment with different lighting scenarios to infuse your photographs with a range of moods and possibly tell a more well-rounded story of the places you visit.

Colorado Fall Colors

A long telephoto lens helped me isolate this beautiful section of trees on a far-away hillside.

#4: Look for Opportunities to Use Your Full Range of Lenses

When photographing fall colors, you will have the opportunity to use every lens in your kit. By using a wide range of focal lengths, you will be able to photograph a more diverse range of scenes and tell a more complete story of the places you visit.

For the photos in this post, I have used focal lengths ranging from 16mm to almost 300mm (and no matter how long of a lens I have with me, I always want more reach). A wide-angle lens will help you take in an expansive scene. A macro lens will help you get close to the delicate leaves on small plants (and a lot of other interesting subjects!) and a telephoto lens will help you isolate details or photograph a far-away scene. On a typical day of photographing fall colors, I will use every lens in my backpack (my kit currently includes a full frame camera, a 16-35mm wide angle lens, a 24-105mm mid-range lens, a 100mm macro for photographing tiny autumn scenes, and a telephoto lens with a reach of up to 300mm).

Delicate autumn plants, Iceland

These leaves were slightly damp when I photographed them. A circular polarizer helped remove the glare and deepen the colors.

#5: Bring Along Helpful Gear

In addition to your normal kit (camera, lenses, and a sturdy tripod), a few small pieces of gear can make a big difference when photographing fall colors. I always make sure to have these items with me for a fall colors trip:

  • Circular polarizer: A circular polarizer can help remove glare and enhance colors when photographing foliage. I always have this filter with me and use it a lot in the fall. You can rotate the filter to see how much of the effect works for your scene.
  • Remote release: Wind can be a constant companion in some fall colors locations. A remote release can help you time your exposure for lulls in the wind, thus increasing your chances of getting a sharp photograph. Compared to your camera’s self timer, a remote release gives you more precise control over timing and keeps you from having to touch the shutter release on your camera.
  • Lens hood and something to shade your lens: If you are photographing a back-lit scene and are facing into the sun, using a lens hood (and sometimes, something to provide more shade for your lens) can reduce the chance of flare. In addition to my lens hoods, I stuff a foam cushion in my pack which doubles as a knee pad and a lens shade.
  • 5-in-1 reflector/diffuser (a collapsible round disc that includes a white diffuser plus reflectors of different colors): This handy piece of gear helps create shade over a small area, which can be helpful for photographing tiny scenes. Although I didn’t need it for the scene above since I took the photo on a cloudy day, this item can create instant shade and even light.
  • A way to keep my camera dry. Fall can sometimes bring rain and snow and both weather conditions can create interesting opportunities for photography (like showing the change of seasons with snow on colorful trees, example above). Thus, I always bring a clear shower cap to cover my camera along with a microfiber towel that I can use to cover my camera and lens in light rain or snow. (Note: never photograph in wet conditions unless you have a weather-sealed camera and a solid insurance policy that covers water damage.)
Aspen leaves and pine cones

I always try to look down when hiking because scenes at your feet can often make interesting photographs. Here, aspen leaves surround fallen pine cones in Califonia’s Eastern Sierra.

#6: Seek to Expand Your Creativity and Embrace Experimentation

Photographing fall colors provides all kinds of opportunities for experimentation and expanding your creativity. If you are at an iconic location this fall, like Maroon Bells in Colorado or Oxbow Bend in Grand Teton National Park, take the photo you came for but also consider all of the other opportunities that surround you – alternative views of grand landscapes, abstract renditions of natural subjects, and creative portraits of plants and trees. Consider experimenting with abstractions like photographing moving leaves or reflections. Slow down, wander around, and explore the small scenes at your feet. Experiment with shallow depth of field or intentional camera movement to expand your portfolio of fall photos.

You can also check out my recent Visual Wilderness post on creativity for some more ideas to test out this autumn.

About Author Sarah Marino

Sarah Marino is a landscape and nature photographer from Colorado who is currently traveling full-time in an Airstream trailer with her fellow photographer husband, Ron Coscorrosa, and their two cats. Sarah strives to capture photographs that convey the elegance, beauty, and the awe-inspiring qualities of the landscapes she explores during her travels. In addition to grand landscapes, Sarah’s portfolio also includes a diverse range of smaller subjects including plants, trees, and abstract natural subjects.

Sarah has published a variety of educational materials for landscape and nature photographers. These ebooks and video tutorials include: Forever Light: The Landscape Photographer’s Guide to Iceland, Desert Paradise: The Landscape Photographer’s Guide to Death Valley National Park, Black & White Photography: A Complete Guide for Nature Photographers, and Beyond the Grand Landscape: A Guide to Photographing Nature’s Smaller Scenes.</li>

You can view more of Sarah's photos, educational resources for nature photographers, and travel stories on her website.

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30 Awesome Photography Links Of The Week

5:09:00 AM

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The world of photography has been an active and exciting place this week with artists and writers posting fresh content in all genres of photography. This weeks list of the best links features tutorials, special features and great photography, all hand selected by Toad Hollow Photography for you. We really hope you enjoy checking out these links as much as the Toad did himself in bringing this list to you.

TUTORIALS

Bite Size Tips: 3 Ways To Get More Beautiful, Softer Light In Your Photographs – managing light is a key concept in terms of great photography and this brief list of tips posted right here on Light Stalking covers 3 ways of getting flattering light. This article will only take a moment to read, but for those starting out with trying to find great light, this will help get you fast-tracked and give you ideas on where to dig further.

mini malist

mini malist

How to Shoot Video With a Gimbal – this is a 10 part video tutorial that covers pretty much all aspects of getting up and running with one of our modern video gimbal rigs. The results from properly applying a gimbal to videography are amazing, oftentimes producing cinema quality footage with a lightweight and simple platform. This set of tutorials will cover all the basics of these tools and will have you up and running in short order.

Architectural Photography Tips That Will Make You Stunning Photos – architectural photography is definitely a thing all it’s own, with challenges and subtle issues that can make or break a great shot. This article covers many of the key factors of shooting buildings and structures, talking about both wide shots and how to capture some of the details that give a building it’s character.

U.S. Department of Defense Current Photos

U.S. Department of Defense Current Photos

10 Top Tips to Get Started with Still Life Photography – for those looking to take excellent still life photographs, this is a great article to read to give you a starting point to work from. Each of the tips presented here will help you create the type of image you’ve envisioned, and you’ll enjoy the process as you work through it.

An Introduction to Macro Photography in less than 10′ – this brief article covers the basics of macro photography, helping you find a way to introduce this type of photography into your own workflow. The sample shots included are terrific, highlighting in a visual way the core idea being expressed in the article.

James Baker

James Baker

Free Contracts and Legal Forms for Landscape Photographers – legal documents are not something that many of us photographers spend a lot of time contemplating, but the requirement for them sometimes is definitely there. Check out this selection of free legal forms and documents you can download to help save you time and future headaches.

How to Record 360 Video With a Multi-Camera Rig – 360* video and photography is a relatively new technology, and as with all emerging technologies there are many different ways to create each with it’s own pros and cons. This great tutorial covers how to utilize a multi-camera rig for this type of imagery, all the way from setup in the field to post-production. The resulting quality of the video is amazing and well worth the effort for those who want to get involved in this style seriously.

SPECIAL FEATURES

Six Days Photographing the Wonder of Iceland – exploring the landscapes and features of Iceland is something that many of us would love to do personally, yet there are a series of hurdles to overcome for most of us to realize this. This article shares an awesome set of photographs and a breathtaking video presentation that takes you on a whirlwind tour of this place that includes some very dramatic drone footage.

Robert Pittman

Robert Pittman

‘Voices of Jerusalem' Is a Stunning Video Tour of the City – check out this incredible video feature that is just over 2 minutes in length, taking you through an incredible visual tour of this ancient city by showcasing many of its interesting facets. The combination of drone based video, along with terrestrial shots, combine to create a fast-paced and alluring view of a city with an endless history.

40 of the Best Street Photos of 2016 by Photographers Around the World – the pure candid nature of street photography lends itself to terrific artistic tension where the viewer is drawn into the shot and finds themselves with a series of unanswered questions. This collection of photographs from this genre is some of the best I’ve seen recently, and those who appreciate this type of imagery will find themselves immersed.

manhhai

manhhai

Behind the Scenes with Large Format Portraiture – we’ve all wondered about what’s involved with shooting large format as the results are astonishing with an incredible resolution. This behind-the-scenes video takes us through a day of shooting on this medium with some great sample portraits to show the results, and the guys then sit and chat about their experiences with this setup and the various pros-and-cons.

GREAT PHOTOGRAPHY

Vietnam Sunset – this ethereal piece comes to us from Jason Row who captured a breathtaking sunset shot featuring a boat near the foreground as a soft pastel color emanates from the setting sun in the background. The terrific mood of this shot is full of rich artistic tension, leaving the viewer with many questions that help you to linger in the frame.

Richard

Richard

In the course of a day – photography is a powerful medium, often sharing a profound story in the context of a single still frame. Joseph de Lange, a local photographer and friend of ours here in the Cowichan Valley on Vancouver Island, recently found a poignant gravesite of a young boy who died during the colonization of the valley rather suddenly, and Joseph’s great shot is accompanied here by the story behind the photo.

Journey To The Unknown – Dany Eid captures an early morning shot of the city of Dubai from a highly elevated perspective, overlooking the peaks of the skyscrapers below as a thick fog encircles the city. The feel of this incredible photograph takes on a highly post-apocalyptic mood with the muted natural light and only the tops of the buildings being visible.

Charlie Marshall

Charlie Marshall

Paper Trail – many urbex themed shots I have seen over the years leave the viewer with a profound sense of wonder in terms of the story behind the particular scene and how it got to this state. This shot from Michael Criswell takes us inside an abandoned school looking down a hallway that is full of great textures from natural weathering. The real mystery in this shot, however, is the paper trail that leads down the hallway leaving us all to wonder why.

Buenas noches – the low angle of perspective used to photograph this piece by Anthony Sotomayor helps in several aspects of the composition as old cars move through the scene with a backdrop of great architecture. In the foreground we find a still pool of water that creates a terrific reflection of the scene, finishing off the picture perfectly.

ANBerlin

ANBerlin

Smiley Barn Family – Oakesdale, Washington – the bucolic nature of rural scenes with old and weathered barns is something that is simply irresistible to many photography enthusiasts. Len Saltiel takes us deep into the Palouse region of Washington with this shot where he showcases 3 weathered barns clustered together in a farm setting.

I love Bled – the square format used for this composition does a terrific job of framing the ancient monastery that sits on a tiny island in the center of Lake Bled, in Slovenia. Gürkan Gündoğdu’s shot also features a perfect silky reflection in the lake’s waters, adding a mirror-like element to this mesmerizing shot.

Federico Pitto

Federico Pitto

Standing Bear – once again we find that bears doing their thing in their natural habitat can make for terrific photography subjects, often taking on candid poses and activities that make for a great shot. In this shot Ron Niebrugge finds a large brown bear standing on it’s hind legs in a meadow in Alaska, and Ron captures a great portrait of this amazing animal.

Tourist View – a tiny European hamlet sits on the sides of a mountain face overlooking still waters in this stunning shot by Juan Pablo de Miguel captured in the heart of the blue hour. The long exposure used to capture this shot turns the waters into a silky reflection of the majestic scene, capped off perfectly by the rugged mountains that linger in the far backdrop.

Peter O'Sullivan SJ

Peter O'Sullivan SJ

A castle in its setting – one of the things many of us expect to see in Ireland beyond the beautiful rolling green landscape is some of the ancient castles that sit in this beautiful setting. Frank King shares a shot of one such castle sitting on a 260 acre plot, framed perfectly by trees that add great context to this amazing structure.

Basilica Di Santa Maria Della Salute – absolutely astonishing details come to life in this delightful shot featuring this well-known architectural wonder in the heart of Venice. Serge Ramelli brings out the details in this building by creating a stitched vertorama of several frames captured during a time when there are no people in the scene.

Edwin van Buuringen

Edwin van Buuringen

Power – Mike Olbinski shares a new shot from his well-known repertoire of storm themed images, this one focusing on a powerful storm that is pounding the ground below with dramatic lightning bolts. Swirling clouds overhead add to the sense of the dynamic and they add to overall sense of drama found in this amazing scene.

Vestrahorn – Etienne Ruff delivers a very striking landscape photograph with this piece that features several key elements to a great composition. Natural leading lines combine with a mirror reflection in a pool of water under a dynamic sky captured using a long exposure, creating something that is captivating in a naturally abstract way.

Andy Belshaw

Andy Belshaw

Darkness… – a dark and long forgotten room is explored in this textured and detailed shot captured by Urban Exploring in an abandoned plastic factory. The dark shadows of the room create nooks and crannies of artistic tension, and the old and weathered windows that let in a little ambient light finish off the composition just perfectly.

Train Station Lyon “Saint-Exupéry TGV”_1 – converging lines and amazing geometries converge in this abstract architectural study that showcases a dramatic roofline of a train station in France. Herbert A. Franke uses the architectural features to their full advantage, delivering a shot that draws the viewer into the amazing image that is sure to mesmerize everyone who sees it.

Stefan Wagener

Stefan Wagener

Container Gardening – my wife and I have talked often about the idea of getting the hull of an old Ford Model-A or somesuch antique car and depositing it in our backyard as a garden ornament of sorts. Lisa Gordon shares a pair of great shots that show this concept, one being of an old vehicle that is a planter, and the other shot of an old boot.

Dancing at sunrise – an amazing bird walks it’s way across a shallow pool of water with it’s wings completely outstretched as the warm colors from the early morning sunrise bathe the scene in incredible hues. Nature images captured and processed this shot just perfectly, creating something that is not to be missed in this week's list for nature photography enthusiasts.

Mathias Appel

Mathias Appel

African Lioness – Wayne Beauregard visits the zoo and captures a wonderful portrait of a mature female lioness sitting and observing the world pass her by. The terrific details of this amazing cat come to life in Wayne’s composition, revealing the inherent beauty and power of these amazing creatures.


Serpents – Martin Podt captures a great shot captured in a forested grove under the cloak of a thick fog, featuring a pathway that creates a natural leading line that leads out towards a terrific vanishing point. The trees stand sentry in this shot, creating haunting figures in the mist that take on a life of their own.

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Time Trap Photography is dedicated to freezing those special moments in life that can be revisited and admired for generations to come. - Shannon Bourque

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“Life is like a camera. Just focus on what’s important and capture the good times, develop from the negatives and if things don’t work out, just take another shot.” — Unknown

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