Friday, January 19, 2018

Understanding Range Masks in Lightroom

4:46:00 AM

What Are Range Masks?

Lightroom Classic CC has a nice new addition called Range Masks which can affect certain colors or luminance ranges. Many people refer to it as luminosity masking although it’s quite different than the luminosity masking found in Photoshop. Luminosity masking allows you to create a mask based on the luminosity values (including color and saturation) of the image. And although I do not see it as a replacement for luminosity masking in Photoshop, it’s a great addition to Lightroom when I only need to tweak local adjustments.

Using Range Masks

The range mask is found by using the gradient filter, radial filter, or the brush. Once the masking is created, click to turn on the range mask. Once the range mask is on, you can choose luminance or color depending on what is most appropriate within your mask. You can only choose one.

If you choose the luminance range mask, adjust its shadow and/or highlight slider until you’ve removed the effect from the pixels you wish to protect. The smoothness slider fine-tunes the effect.If you choose the color range mask, use the color picker to select the color in your image you want to adjust. The tool lets you choose a range of tones by clicking and dragging in a color area. You can also pick multiple colors by holding down the Shift key while clicking the color picker. You can then adjust the tolerance amount.

It is important to note that the range mask only works with adjustments. You cannot use it to adjust curves, HSL, or split toning but it does boost the selective editing capabilities of Lightroom which allows you to stay longer in a non-destructive RAW editing program. In this short video, I demonstrate both the luminance choice and the color choice.

Here are couple of more images on Visual Wilderness that were edited using Range Mask in Lightroom:

  • Iceland

  • Crown Point Overlook, Columbia River Gorge, Oregon (OR), USA

About Author Christine Hauber

The current that underlies Christine Hauber's work is the concept of serenity in a world of chaos. With 25 years of professional photography experience, she continues to be attracted to the simplicity of the minimal and thus makes every effort to be a faithful visual recorder of the world around her. She wishes for her images to distill scenes ranging from the ephemeral to the eternal, from the abstruse to the symbolic. As a dedicated artist, she strives constantly to explore and expand her definition of the splendor and mysterious in life and nature. Her images have an ethereal and enduring quality.

Christine's work is published in various books, magazines and websites and has been printed and hangs in homes and offices worldwide. She teaches private photography workshops worldwide focusing on the needs of each unique client.

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19. Januar 2018

4:05:00 AM

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Thursday, January 18, 2018

Photos Reveal Samsung Galaxy S9 with Variable Aperture Lens

10:01:00 AM

The much-anticipated launch of the new Samsung Galaxy S9 smartphone can’t come sooner for some fans. To be revealed at MWC in Barcelona in February, the Samsung Galaxy S9 is already causing a stir with one big rumor.

A rumor that was seemingly confirmed by some leaked photos.

The rumor was that the new Samsung Galaxy S9 will come equipped with a variable aperture lens. The leaked image is from a reddit post and apparently shows retail packaging for the phone.

The aperture specified for the Galaxy S9 is the same on found on the ultra-expensive, China-only handset we talked about late last year. The W2018 flip-phone turned heads with its price tag, but also with its amazing features, among them was a F1.5 / F2.4 aperture specification.

Image via MOHI SYED from Pexels.com.

The W2018 switches between F1.5 and F2.4 when the phone sense there is enough light to capture the background with as much focus as possible.

DPReview reports that the F1.5 aperture on the W2018 is the fastest available on any phone, making it ideal for low-light shoots. Considering the phone is targeted at affluent social media mavens, many of whom attend events without the best lighting, these specifications for the W2018 would make sense.

If the specs prove to be correct, the phone will also be able to record super slow-motion videos much in line high frame rate devices like those from Sony. DPReview also reports “AKG-powered stereo speakers, and we'd expect the S9 to come with Qualcomm's latest Snapdragon 845 chipset” but that otherwise the S9’s specs don’t differ that much from the S8’s specifications.

As a refresher, those specs happened to be:

– Super AMOLED panel with Quad HD+ resolution (1440 x 2960 pixels)
– 18:9 aspect ratio
– 4GB of RAM
– 64GB of internal storage
– 8MP front camera
– IP68 water and dust resistant body

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Publications Reports Quality Problems with Fujifilm Lenses

8:10:00 AM

Two photography publications reported quality issues with Fujifilm lenses leading to speculation there may be a quality assurance problem at the vaunted optics manufacturer.

The reports indicate new Fujifilm lenses arriving with “sizable dust specks, cracks, and excessive variations between copies,” a distressing thing indeed.

A report on January 3, 2018 in Photography Life detailed “multiple samples of a number of lenses” that contained debris between lens elements that could not be removed without a professional cleaning.

Nasim Mansurov writes: “While I am generally happy about lens variation of GF lenses and I am especially happy with their excellent performance, I am not a big fan of Fujifilm’s QA processes…It seems to me that Fuji is almost rushing with the medium format GF lenses, trying to deliver as many units as possible to try to match the demand, while paying less attention to its manufacturing processes.”

Image via Math from Pexels.com.

Mansurov claims the issues are particularly rife with Fujifilm GF lenses. One model, the GF 110mm f/2, required two different lenses before Mansurov found a clean version. The author further noted that there was an extremely wide variation in quality between cheaper lenses.

“Cheaper lenses like the GF 45mm f/2.8 and GF 63mm f/2.8 have shown more variation than I would like to see…The lens to watch out is the GF 32-64mm f/4. While it is a pretty solid performer overall, the samples I have tested so far had uneven corner to corner performance, indicating poor assembly / decentering issues.”
Photography Life’s discovery was seconded by Fujiaddict who had issues with a Fujinon GF 110mm f/2 that had specs and fuzz between lens elements and a crack in the lens hood.

Louis Ferreira at Fujiaddict commented, “I know there have been some reports of a speck here or there, but I have never seen a lens this bad from Fujifilm, nor have I ever purchased a lens that came in this shape…There was no damage to the shipping container or box and these lenses come very well packaged, so I have to presume this damage occurred entirely at Fujifilm.

Continuing, Ferreira writes: “The lint coating had to have happened at the factory because the lens comes tightly wrapped in plastic and the plastic and inside of the box were clean. The cracked hood also likely occurred at the factory before packaging and went unnoticed while packaging.”

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This New Tool Will Take Your Light Painting to the Next Level

6:00:00 AM

I have dabbled in light painting on and off for many years but really began focussing on it about 12 months ago. Now I must admit I am obsessed and have collected an array of tools of all shapes and sizes. Naturally, when Fotorgear offered a review unit of Magilight –  their new LED light painting stick, I jumped at the chance.

At its core, the Magilight is an LED light stick comprising 144 individually addressable LED lights, and a microcomputer controller. It allows you to load images and ribbons via a TF card, which can be displayed in a variety of ways, allowing you to create all manner of light painting images.

Unboxing the Magilight

The unit comes well protected in a padded bag, and comprises of the Magilight, two “26350” lithium in rechargeable batteries, battery charger and USB cable.

Putting it together is as easy as inserting the batteries, and plugging the coiled cable into the control unit.

Features of the Magilight

  • 144 RGB LED lights, 800 ANSI lumens
  • Rechargeable batteries
  • Tripod socket built into handle
  • Adjustable angle on the handle
  • Built in swivel to make spinning easier
  • Customisable brightness, flash, flicker, colour temperature, play speed, play direction and start delay.
  • Recessed TF card slot – no accidental bumping here

Ways to use Magilight:

  • Drawing light images: store images and display them one line at a time
  • RGB modulation: you can even use it as a background light for video or photo
  • Controllable white balance, brightness, speed, orientation
  • Tripod mount design: so you can put Magilight on  a slide railway, dolly or a tripod
  • Sliding handle – can be positioned anywhere along the length of the Magilight – with the centre point clearly marked
  • User-friendly UI: everyone can learn it in 5 minutes. In fact I found the menu system very user friendly and easy to learn.

The Magilight In Action

To be honest it took me a few goes to get the timing right for my images, however, once I did, there was no looking back. You can load your own creations (Photo's, artwork, etc) onto the micro-sd card to be light-painted into your images. The user manual contains a simple set of instructions to follow, the results speak for themselves.

It takes a bit of practice to hold the Magilight level when you are working on uneven ground, but again a few trial runs usually sorts things out without further issues.

The elephant in the room…

So, let's address the elephant in the room. How does the Magilight compare to its nearest competitor – the Pixelstick?

  • It has less LED lights (144 v 200), but they are closer together, meaning less noticeable scan lines.
  • It is not as long as the pixelstick.
  • It is a one piece unit – no more fumbling in the dark trying to assemble parts
  • It has a built in swivel
  • It has a variable angle handle.
  • Selectable colour temperature, flicker and start delay.
  • Batteries are installed into the handle

Both units have their place in light painting, don't get me wrong, it's just that I find assembling the Pixelstick in the dark tedious and at times frustrating. Give me a one-piece unit any day.

Light Painting with the Magilight Tool

Conclusion:

The Magilight is a well thought out and engineered tool. The swivel is smooth and makes using the tool a breeze, the handle with adjustments to both angle and position along the length of the stick is a very welcome feature. The tripod mount is invaluable for those into video.

For my money, it is a very worthy addition to my light painting kit.

Launch:

Fotorgear launched the Magilight on January 17, 2018, and it raised greater than 3 times their funding goal in just a matter of hours!

You can purchase yours via the following link: https://goo.gl/oQQgYQ

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18. Januar 2018

4:05:00 AM

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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Knowing About These 8 Photographers Will Help You Understand Environmental Portraiture

6:01:00 AM

As we’ve already discussed, Environmental Portraits grant both subject and background a high level of importance in the frame. Portraiture alone can be seen as the picture of the fish, and Environmental Portraiture as the fish within the fishbowl. That said, we want to introduce you to eight photographers who will give you a better idea of what Environmental Portraits are. Some of them are exclusively Environmental Portrait photographers; others, not so much. Still, when required, these last ones have sometimes taken portraits with an environmental approach.

August Sander (1876 – 1964)

Image by Source, Fair use, http://ift.tt/2De2oM0

When August Sander started taking photographs, they were just images or portraits. Sander has been described as “the most important German portrait photographer of the early twentieth century.” His portraits had a sincere voice in them, just the thing that environmental portraits pursue. His work is now considered to be Fine Art at its finest, and you can see some of his work here and here. I don't know if this image is his most famous one, but is a personal favorite of mine. So, if you don’t know his work (which we pretty much doubt), do yourself a favor and click on that link right now! (You can also watch this video made by Sir Ted Forbes.)

Paul Strand (1890 – 1976)

Image by Paul Strand – Source: http://ift.tt/2DGdBpy, Public Domain, http://ift.tt/2DeisgC

Paul Strand was a highly influential photographer, and was also an early icon of the renowned “Straight Photography” movement in which Ansel Adams was also involved. As you can see here, Strand had great commitment to various photography genres, including portraiture. By viewing his portraits, we can get an early grasp of how he approached people in their most pristine environments. Studying early photographers is important, because they lay the groundwork for what we now know as photography. This is my favorite image by Strand because it depicts a whole family in a way that is obviously not natural, but feels like it was.

Arnold Newman (1918 – 2006)

Every time the phrase “Environmental Portrait” is mentioned, Arnold Newman is the photographer many people think of. He was known for exerting a big influence on the Environmental Portraiture movement, even when he composed abstract still-life work. He portrayed public figures like no one else. We'll dedicate an exclusive post focusing entirely on Newman's work in a couple of days, but for now you can see a bit of his massive body of work here.

Daniel Mordzinski (1960 – )

Daniel Mordzinski is an Argentinian photographer currently based in Paris, France. If Arnold Newman focused on artists and politicians, Mordzinski went the extra mile and focused entirely on writers. He has gained the title of being the “Photographer of the Writers”. And when somebody with resources needs a portrait of a writer, Mordzinski is the guy they call. He has been working for more than three decades on a very ambitious “Human Atlas” of the world of Latin American literature. I had the great pleasure of attending an exhibition of his work, and seeing all those writers was fascinating. It was like walking inside a party where many of my favorite writers were invited to be with me (because the museum was pretty empty, too). You can see some of his work here; there you'll find poets, novelists, essayists and dramatists.

Annie Leibovitz (1949 – )

Image by Robert Scoble from Half Moon Bay, USA – Annie Leibovitz at her SF exhibition, CC BY 2.0, http://ift.tt/2DgC2sA

My whole perception of Annie Leibovitz is built on a specific body of work (and a couple of images I have seen on the Internet), beyond her largely popular and complex conceptual work. In this book, you can find candid shots of family and friends, and a lot of portraits with a great environmental feel. From actors to politicians, they all reside in spaces that seem extremely natural. She opens the book by saying “I don’t have two lives, this is one life, and the personal pictures and the assignment work are all part of it.” Some of the figures seen here are Johnny Cash, Nicole Kidman, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Keith Richards, Michael Jordan, Joan Didion, Patti Smith, Nelson Mandela, Jack Nicholson, William Burroughs and even R2-D2.

Mary Ellen Mark (1940 – 2015)

Image by Waterjunebug – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, http://ift.tt/2wfF3a8

Mary Ellen Mark was a splendid documentary photographer, and her work goes beyond the portraiture genre. But some images – like the ones she captured of circuses (like this one and this other) – give us good examples of what capturing the fish within the fishbowl should look like. Just recently I heard this interview with Mark with Ibarionex Perello, which will be useful for any serious photographer to hear.

Jimmy Nelson (1967 – )

Image by Vera de Kok – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, http://ift.tt/2DGVOhX

Jimmy Nelson is a charismatic British photojournalist largely known for his portraits of tribal and indigenous peoples. His environmental portraits don't focus on public figures and famous people, but on tribes that are about to disappear. I like to define his images as Ethnographic Portraits, as they all show an obviously pure environmental quality. Therefore, his work will be extremely useful to anyone interested in environmental portraits. Nelson's work is unique; here you are a couple of truly inspiring TED Talks about his work. You can also indulge yourself with his images on his website.

Sara Facio (1932 – )

Sara Facio is the woman responsible for giving a recognizable face to many writers from the Latin American literary boom. She portrayed them in a very different way, without poses, candidly, inside their own spaces. It is said that Facio has a distinctive pace, and after a while, she becomes completely invisible. Check out some of her photographs of writers here for exquisite examples of her candid environmentals.

Many photographers have been taking liberties and experimenting with Environmental Portraiture conventions. For me, the most critical thing is that the shoot is done with a real person in their real environment. Many contemporary photographers have used this as inspiration for their conceptual and staged portraits, but that's a topic for another day.

We hope you have enjoyed this brief selection, and if you know of other photographers who could fit in the description we've been developing for Environmental Portraiture, please share them with us in the comments section.

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Why Upcoming Lunar Eclipse Presents a Rare Photo Opportunity

5:36:00 AM

Just five months after a total solar eclipse passed across the U.S. mainland, photographers in North America will be treated to another great opportunity to photograph an eclipse. In the early morning hours of January 31, 2018, Earth’s shadow will block the sun from hitting the moon, producing a total lunar eclipse that will glow orange in the sky.

A Rare Opportunity

Although total lunar eclipses can be seen much more frequently than total solar eclipses, this upcoming eclipse could be a special opportunity for photographers. For those in the western half of the continental U.S. and the middle part of Canada, the moon will be very low on the horizon during totality. This will allow photographers to use a long telephoto lens to render the moon large, while still including some of the landscape in the foreground.

total lunar eclipse, January 31, 2018

This lunar eclipse over the Boulder Flatirons occurred when the moon was fairly low in the sky. However, it will be even lower in much of North America on January 31, so you’ll want a pretty clear view of the horizon.

If you want to photograph this eclipse, you should start planning where to shoot it. You should pick out a spot where the moon will be directly over an interesting object, like a mountain, rock formation, or building.

Planning Your Shoot

You can go to: this website to see the exact times of totality at the location you’ll be shooting.

I recommend using the free software program Stellarium to visualize how the eclipse will appear. First, press F6 and select a spot near where you will be shooting. Next, press F4 and check the “Scale Moon” box. This will make the moon larger and show the orange glow that it will have during totality. Now, press F5 and set the time and date to the start time of the total eclipse, as found on timeandate.com above. You can then use the “fast forward” button on the bottom left pop-up menu to see how long the eclipse will last and how high it will be over the horizon.

You can do more precise planning using an app like The Photographer’s Ephemeris or PhotoPills. These apps have built-in maps that let you plan exactly where you need to stand to include both the moon and a foreground object in an image. Plan to stand a long ways away from any foreground object, so you can include most or all of it in your shot with a long lens.

Equipment & Fieldwork

Total Lunar Eclipse over Canyonlands N.P.

Total lunar eclipse over Moses and Zeus in Canyonlands National Park, Utah.

Another great thing about this eclipse is that will happen during twilight for most observers in North America. As a result, there should be enough light to capture good detail in the land and the moon with a single exposure. When a lunar eclipse occurs during the dark of night, you usually need to blend multiple exposures to capture good detail throughout the image.

You will need a long lens of around 200-600mm to render the moon fairly large in your image. I recommend the Tamron 150-600, as it is relatively inexpensive for a large telephoto lens (though cartainly not cheap).

When the moon is low on the horizon, it may be bright enough out for you use the auto-exposure settings on your camera. However, to ensure a proper exposure, I recommend using manual exposure settings, especially when the moon is higher in the sky. You should open your aperture to its widest setting (like f5.6) and set the shutter speed to about ½ second (with longer exposures, the moon can start to blur). If your images are coming out significantly underexposed, you can raise the ISO until you get a good exposure (but make sure you’re not blowing out any highlights and lower the ISO as it starts to get brighter out). Always zoom in on your first few images after you take them to make sure your focus is set properly at infinity and everything appears sharp.

Blood Moon Over Utah

Unlike the upcoming lunar eclipse, the moon was high in the sky during this eclipse over Utah. I had to use a wide lens to include the foreground, thus making the moon appear much smaller.

When the moon is very low on the horizon, the sun will be about to rise in the opposite part of the sky. It may be so bright out that the eclipsed moon won’t show up very well in your images. So, make sure and shoot when the moon is a little higher in the sky as well. The moon will glow orange for over an hour in locations where you can view most or all of totality. As a result, you will have plenty of time to get shots with the moon at different heights and to move around and capture different compositions.

Whatever you do, make sure and set your alarm very early and don’t hit the snooze button! If you live in the western part of North America, the next eclipse that will be this low in the sky before sunrise will occur exactly 19 years later, on January 31, 2037.

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17. Januar 2018

4:05:00 AM

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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Nikon Just Introduced a $10k Storytellers’ Scholarship

10:01:00 AM

It’s no secret that the cost of higher education in the United States and Canada has skyrocketed in the past decade. With little sign of letting up, many students are relying upon scholarships from a disparate array of sources to make ends meet financially.

Life is particularly tough for students in fine arts and humanities but Nikon hopes to change that with a new scholarship.

Students in the United States and Canada are receiving an excellent opportunity to win a $USD 10,000 scholarship from Nikon to help defray the costs of higher education.

As part of its 100th anniversary celebration, Nikon’s “Storytellers” scholarship was announced earlier this year as part of the company’s efforts to commemorate its founding and began accepting applications on December 14.

The money is to promote the “next generation” of creators and is open to undergraduate and graduate students at accredited universities or technical schools who are pursuing a career or specialization in visual arts, fine arts, journalism, film, photography and multimedia/content creation according to the program’s website.

Image via Parag Deshmuk from Pexels.com.

The committee will select ten finalists to receive the scholarship. These finalists will be drawn from a pool of semi-finalists who will submit portfolios for consideration as a finalist for the program. Scholarship amounts will be awarded for academic year 2018-2019.

Nikon was founded in Japan in 1917 and specializes in optics and imaging products. The company is regarded as one of the top Japanese brands in the whole world and one of the top camera manufacturers as well.

Products from this conglomerate include cameras, camera lenses, binoculars, microscopes, ophthalmic lenses, measurement instruments, rifle scopes, spotting scopes, and the steppers used in the photolithography steps of semiconductor fabrication.

The company started as Japan Optical Industries Company, or Nippon Kougaku Kougyou Kabushikigaisha, but was renamed Nikon Corporation in 1988, taking its new moniker from its world-class camera line.

You can find out more information about the scholarship here at this link.

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Sofia Richie Sued for Sharing Photographs of Herself on Social Media

8:01:00 AM

Stories of photo theft are rife in the industry, but only occasionally is the alleged culprit the subject of said photos.

And in the age of ubiquitous social media, where awesome video and breathtaking photography set one “celebrity” apart from another, having amazing media is a must-have asset.

Unfortunately, it can be expensive if you choose to steal it – as one celebrity’s fashion model daughter is now learning.

Famous singer Lionel Richie’s daughter Sofia finds herself in hot water with a photographer for sharing pictures taken of herself on her social media accounts without prior approval.

Image via FancyCrave from Pexels.com.

With an Instagram following of 3.2 million, the shares were noticed by Backgrid, the agency that owned the photos.

For its part, the photography agency reports that requests to take down the photos were denied.

The celebrity photo agency is seeking a hefty payout as well – $USD 1 million.

Sofia shared photos taken that were part of a collaboration with Japanese brand Samantha Thavasa in 2017.
Backgrid states that its lawyers sent cease-and-desist orders that were either ignored or partially followed.

While some of the photos were removed, others remained visible on Richie’s Instagram account as of publication.

Why Sofia partially complied with the cease-and-desist order remains a mystery.

Usually social media is handled by outside professionals who curate and present the “image” these stars display to the world.

Perhaps a miscommunication occurred at this stage in the process?

Everything will remain speculation until the matter is resolved between Backgrid and Sofia Richie.

While it is understandable that Backgrid would not want their photos used without permission or compensation, it becomes an interesting story when the alleged thief is the subject of said photos.

Like FStoppers points out, as photography and video social media become more prevalent we can expect more violations of this nature in the future.

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How to Perfect the Art of the Monochrome Landscape

6:01:00 AM

Modern cameras allow us to capture incredible, colourful landscape images. A quick look through sites like 500px will show amazing examples of the genre. However, when someone posts a stunning black and white landscape, it very often gets more likes and comments than a colour based equivalent. Black and white landscapes appeal to our most basic photographic desires. Their lack of colour as a compositional and emotive trigger means that we appreciate how much thought and creativity has gone into a great monochrome landscape. Great black and white landscapes are not easy to produce, they require forethought, a great understanding of light and form and good knowledge of exposure. Today we are going to take a look at the elements that make a great black and white landscape.

How Strong Colour and Geometric Definition Can Help a Photo Stand Out

It might seem odd to mention colour when talking about monochrome but it is vital to the way we shoot. Colour is one of the ways we separate objects in black and white images so we are looking for great colour contrast in our shots.

Along with colour we also need well defined geometrical shapes. These provide hard contrast edges to our image and work as compositional tools to hold the shot together. A good combination of well-separated colours and strong geometric shapes will provide definition to a good monochrome landscape.

Strong geometric shapes work well in black and white. By Misha Sokolnikov

This is Why Patterns and Texture Are Important in Black and White Photography

Two other important elements to any black and white landscape are patterns and textures. These provide depth to our image, giving the two dimensional a 3D feel. Patterns might be different crops in a field, different rock strata even the shape of a road as it winds across a landscape. Textures tend to be visible on closer elements in our scene. They might be rust on an old tractor or the abrasive surface of a rock. Soft directional light is best for highlighting both patterns and textures.

Black and white really shows off textures well. By BeckerG

Why Skies and Clouds Can Make or Break a Landscape Image

The sky is an important element in many landscapes and in particular monochromatic ones. A well-defined sky holds our eye in the picture, returning it to the main interest, the landscape below. A flat uninteresting sky will allow our eye, and our interest to wander off the top of the image. Clouds are what make the sky. It could be fluffy white clouds on deep blue or multi-toned stormy clouds with lots of shape and form to them. Even high-level cirrus can help keep our eye on the landscape. Keeping definition in the sky is an internal part of the exposure and we shall look at that now.

A great sky can look dramatic in black and white, by steffen#

Understanding Exposure, Filters, and HDR for Better Results

Exposure is one of the toughest things to get right in a monochromatic landscape. We need the subject to be well defined and lit but also need definition in shadow regions and to avoid blowing the sky. Ansel Adams devised the zone system for this problem and today most cameras use a digital version of his system with metric metering. Matrix metering is good but it is not always right. For a landscape, often spot metering is the best option. You can meter for your main subject matter and compensate as required.

Often the biggest exposure issue will be maintaining detail in the sky whilst having the correct exposure on the subject. We have a couple of options to help overcome this. Firstly we can shot an exposure bracket and merge this as an HDR in post production. This works well most of the time but on windy days, issues can be seen in leaves and grass.

The other option is to use graduated ND filters to hold back the sky, maintaining the foreground.

HDR in black and white is often more subtle than colour. By Ah Wei (Lung Wei)

Why Post Production is So Important for Black and White Landscape Photography

Post production is as important to digital black and white as printing was to film. Apps such as Lightroom and Photoshop have a plethora of different tools for black and white conversion but probably the most important are the ones that control colour. These sliders allow us to change the contrast and levels of individual colours and tailor the image to what we want.

For example, by reducing levels on the blue channel we can make a blue sky look a much darker tone. Similarly raising levels on the green channel will brighten the tone of grass and foliage. Combining the colour tools with selective masking we can fine tune any black and white image into something stunning.

Monochrome landscapes are not easy to shoot, but by appreciating how colours become tones and shapes and patterns define a shot, you can soon start to “see” in black and white. Patience, good light and of course a beautiful scene are also elements that will go into a great black and white landscape.

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16. Januar 2018

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Time Trap Photography is dedicated to freezing those special moments in life that can be revisited and admired for generations to come. - Shannon Bourque

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